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 Stem Aquarium Plants

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PostSubject: Stem Aquarium Plants   Fri Apr 16, 2010 10:50 am

Stem Aquarium Plants
Hardy plants that fit just about anywhere in the aquarium.They can be propagated with cuttings.

Source: Animal-World

Stem Aquarium Plants - Types

Anacharis
Brazilian Waterweed - Elodea
Egeria densa

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Anacharis, a hardy and easily kept plant, is probably the most commonly kept aquarium plant.

Anacharis, Brazilian Waterweed, and Elodea are all common names used to for this species, Egeria densa. While this species is most suitable for a tropical aquarium, it can also be kept in cooler water. These same common names are also applied to the American or Canadian waterweed species of the Elodea genus, which are very similar. Elodea species are suitable for cool aquariums or ponds however, rather than tropical environments. To be certain of which 'Anacharis' you are obtaining, be sure to check its scientific name.

Anacharis will root if the shoots are buried in the gravel, however they can be kept either as floating plants or as rooted plants. They grow very well in ponds and goldfish tanks and will survive in cold water. They are great beginner plants because they adapt very easily, grow quickly, and are easily propagated. They are also good oxygenators. The stems will grow up to 50 cm (20 in) or more, so they usually need to be kept trimmed.

Brazilian Pennywort
Hydrocotyle leucocephala

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Brazilian Pennywort is an exotic plant with a very funky look, a most Interesting plant to add to an aquarium!

The Brazilian Pennywort is a great plant for midground to background or surface decoration. It has thin spindly stems and lily pad shaped leaves. At any given moment, plants will sport leaves ranging in size from a dime to a half dollar.

At each leaf joint the plant sends out white roots. Very healthy specimens will send up a wispy white bloom that will open near the surface. Some aquarists choose to not root Brazilian Pennywort in the substrate, instead allowing it to grow horizontally on the surface.

Brazilian pennywort can grow a few inches per week in just about any tank. However underfed plants will be slow growing, weak, and unattractive. A good fertilizer regimen would include both a root fertilizer (usually mixed in with the substrate) and a leaf absorbed fertilizer (usually added to the water). Co2 fertilization also helps this plant a lot. Brazilian Pennywort will be nibbled on by snails and some fish, but healthy specimens recover easily.

Broadleaf Ludwigia
Ludwigia palustris

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Due to it's beautiful red-green leaves and ease of care, the Broadleaf Ludwigia is a great addition to your aquarium.

The Broadleaf Ludwigia is a great plant for midground to background decoration, as it can reach a height of 20 inches (50 cm). It adapts to most aquarium environments readily, especially if provided with bright lighting. The leaves grow fairly broad at a moderate rate, with reddish-green coloring throughout. They tend to clump together and will tend to try to grow towards the surface of the water. If you cut it back regularly, plenty of side shoots with grow, which is an easy way to propagate this plant.


Carolina Fanwort, Green Cabomba
Cabomba caroliniana

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Cabomba is a very common and beautiful aquarium plant that is great for beginner aquariums!

Cabomba will root if the shoots are buried in the gravel. The stems will grow up to 50 cm (20 in) and so in an aquarium they will need to be trimmed periodically. They are also easily propagated by simply planting cuttings from the present plants. Cabomba will do great in almost any aquarium environment, including harder water and minimal light. However, the brighter the light the better it will grow.

Creeping Jenny
Lysimachia nummularia

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The Creeping Jenny is an ideal coldwater aquarium because in it's natural habitat it loves to grow in marshes and ponds! But it will also do great in many other aquarium environments!

The Creeping Jenny adapts very well to most environments and is very easy to care for. It doesn't grow too tall, only up to 16 inches (40 cm), and is a good foreground or midground plant. It has a moderate growth rate and will grow very well if kept in bright lighting. It is especially suitable for tropical aquariums and also grows well in coldwater environments, but it will adapt to other environments easily. It is easily propagated, simply by planting cuttings from the original plant.

Dwarf Rotala or Tooth-cup
Rotala rotundifolia

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This Rotala is generally an easy plant to care for and is a great addition to many aquariums due to its beautiful tint of pink coloring on the leaves!

Rotala rotundifolia, also sometimes called Rotala indica has small leaves and is a good display for the background or midground of an aquarium. It grows to about 20 inches (50 cm) if cared for correctly and grows at a moderate rate. Leaf color varies from olive-green to pink and there are several different shape variations of the leaves, including oval and oblong, very narrow, or really round.

The Dwarf Rotala should be kept in bright light and at its recommended temperature of 68-82 ° Fahrenheit to obtain its best coloring and growth rate. However it usually can adapt to lower temperatures and light levels. Propagation of this Rotala is usually fairly easy. Simply planting cuttings from the main plant usually works great. However, make sure the cuttings are least 4 inches long to ensure good growth.

The water conditions should be regularly checked to help the Dwarf Rotala thrive. It needs soft water with a pH between 5 and 7.2. Make sure to perform regular water changes and fertilize regularly with a liquid fertilizer that contains iron because iron is important for healthy growth. Also provide some sort of bottom fertilization.

Fountain Plant
Ophiopogon japonicus

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The Fountain Plant gets it's common name from the fact that the leaves tend to bend outward and back, causing it to look like a fountain!

The Fountain Plant can be a beautiful and fulfilling addition to an aquarium and has a normal variety that reaches 8 inches (20 cm) in height, as well as a dwarf variety (Ophiopogon japonicus var. kyoto) that only reaches 4 inches (10 cm) in height. It grows at a moderate rate and produces long narrow leaves, and goes best as a foreground plant, a midground plant, or along the sides of the aquarium. It is best to usually group several plants together, with small spaces between each one.

Although the Fountain Plant is a fairly hardy plant and can survive in most conditions, the water should be regularly checked to help it thrive. It needs a pH between 6.5 and 7.5, and minimal light to keep it growing and looking healthy. Make sure to perform regular water changes and fertilize regularly after each change. The bottom substrate should be nutrient-rich. Propagation of the Fountain Plant is done by planting cuttings from the side sprouts of the main plant.

Hornwort
Ceratophylum demersum

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Hornwort is a good plant for aquariums with plant eating fish, since the hard leaves do not taste so good!

A rootless plant, Hornwort can be kept floating at the top of the aquarium or buried in the gravel to suit your taste. If you bury Hornwort in the substrate, the Hornwort stems are held in the gravel by root-like organs called rhizoids. The stems will branch off to form nice thickets for fish and especially fry to retreat into. Be careful with it however, because it breaks easily and many of the pieces can become their own plants. Hornwort is an easy plant to care for since

Hornwort can be kept in many aquarium environments, such as coldwater aquariums and tropical aquariums. It is a great aquarium plant for all levels of experienced aquarists. It is also readily available at fish stores or online.

Variegated Japanese Rush
Acorus gramineus

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This Variegated Japanese Rush is actually not a true aquatic plant, but can survive for up to a year completely submersed in water!

The Variegated Japanese Rush resembles the true aquatic Japanese Rush, but has long grass-like leaves that usually have 2 or 3 white stripes along each light green leaf. The leaves are tough and leathery and will grow to a maximum height of 14 inches (35 cm).

Since it is not a true aquatic plant, the Variegated Japanese Rush does better in tropical aquariums where about half of each leaf is above water. It will grow in many substrates and the roots are thick and are quite capable of taking nutrients directly from the water. The Japanese Rush propagates by producing shoots from the base which will eventually spread and create their own plant.

Water Milfoil
Myriophyllum Sp.

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The Water Milfoil is an ideal plant for the aquarium. Though they do require good light they're not overly particular about the composition of the water and they can withstand great fluctuations in temperature.

Members of the genus Myriophyllum are popular aquarium plants and the aquatic species of Water Milfoil have found their way into hobbyists tanks for generations. It is one of the many aquarium plants sold under the name "Foxtail".

The delicately cut green or red foliage of the Water Milfoil is surprisingly hardy. This plant prefers strong light but is usually willing to compromise on this. It is an excellent plant for filling in gaps in the aquascape as it will adapt to many conditions. Water Milfoil will probably tolerate colder temperatures than any aquarium fish.

Water Milfoil can easily reach the surface of most aquariums. When it does this, snip off the top 1/3-1/2 of the plant and replant. This plant is also a must for breeding tanks as an egg site or fry refuge. Aquarium gravel is a perfectly acceptable substrate for this plant as roots are primarily anchors. Be sure to plant the stems separately to allow them to root.

The only problem that is encountered with this beauty is its tendency to trap debris. This can be easily solved by occasional gentle shakes to free debris. Alternatively, place the Water Milfoil near the suction or current of a filter. As with most plants, occasional fertilization would be appreciated.

This plant (Myriophyllum species) are on many invasive species lists, so extreme caution needs to be taken that no part of the plant is released into the environment.

Water Primrose
Ludwigia repens

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The Water Primrose is a great plant for beginners because it adapts readily to almost any environment and is very easy to maintain!

The Water Primrose is an extremely hardy and easy plant to care for. It grows to a maximum height of 20 inches (50 cm) at a fast rate if provided with the proper care. It goes best as a midground or background plant. Once the plant grows up to the surface of the water, the stems will begin to grow horizontally across it and the leaves will grow closer together.

The leaves can vary from plant to plant, but are generally wide and round with a olive-green on top and a red on the bottom. Also, the brighter the light, the more intense the colors will be. Propagation of the Water Primrose is quite simple and all that needs to be done is to plant cuttings off the main plant.

The water conditions should be regularly checked to help the Water Primrose thrive. It needs a pH between 5.5 and 7.5, with the temperature more cooler than warmer. Make sure to perform regular water changes and fertilize regularly after each change. Bottom fertilization that is very nutrient-rich is important. Also prune the plant regularly to keep it healthy and growing well.

Water Wisteria
Hygrophila difformis

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The leaves of the Water Wisteria depend on the temperature of the water - at higher temperatures they are large with more space between them; however if the temperature is lower they are smaller and much closer together!

The Water Wisteria can be a beautiful and fulfilling addition to an aquarium if it is given proper care. This hygrophila grows to a maximum height of 20 inches (50 cm) at a moderate rate, and goes best as a midground or background plant. They should be planted with only a few stalks together, and each plant should have space between it and the next one because they will grow and need plenty of room to spread. The leaves themselves can grow quite large - up to 4 inches long!

The water conditions should be regularly checked to help the Water Wisteria thrive. It needs a pH between 6.5 and 7.5, and very bright light to keep it growing and looking healthy. Make sure to perform regular water changes and fertilize regularly after each change. Liquid fertilizers with iron on them should be used after each change and carbon dioxide fertilization is also a good idea. The bottom substrate should be nutrient-rich. Propagation of the Water Wisteria is done by planting the side shoots of the main plant or by planting cuttings.
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PostSubject: Re: Stem Aquarium Plants   Tue May 25, 2010 12:47 am

NICE INFOS. . .
For me. . . Water Primrose is one of the best aquatic plants i suggest. . . ewan ko lang kung magkano n ngayon un at kung my nagbebenta p. . . thumbs up
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PostSubject: weed   Wed Nov 24, 2010 3:31 am

anu kea tama nyan pgsinindihan? Hehd

up ntn 2, informative topic!
beri nayz.
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